Category Archives: Principles of forest gardening

sensitive co-creativity

Nature invigorates, sustains, rejuvenates the forest garden, the forest gardener is there to see and to experience and then to react in as sensitive a way as they can.  My partner and I don’t (unfortunately) live here in Wales all … Continue reading

Posted in Borderland Garden, Doing the minimum, ecosystem, forest garden development, Forest Gardening, Polyculture learning, Principles of forest gardening, Relationship with nature, Waiting, Watching | Tagged | 3 Comments

Roots and All podcast

I had the great joy of chatting to Sarah Wilson from the Roots and All podcast one afternoon last week and you can hear our conversation here. Enjoy!

Posted in Forest Gardening, Principles of forest gardening, the garden of equal delights | 2 Comments

becoming delightfully obsessed

alongside the evolution of the forest garden there is the evolution of the forest gardener As forest gardeners we are all unique individuals and each forest garden is the result of the unfolding of the gardener’s hopes, intentions and interactions … Continue reading

Posted in a different gardener, ecosystem, Edible Perennial Gardening, Forest Gardening, Perennial Vegetables, Principles of forest gardening, the garden of equal delights | 4 Comments

nature writes the story

Planting a forest garden is in part a statement of intent and also in part a question.  The intent is to facilitate and support the development and growth of a healthy edible ecosystem.  The question is ‘what will happen next’? … Continue reading

Posted in a forest garden is gardened differently, Forest Gardening, Principles of forest gardening, Relationship with nature, Waiting, Watching | 1 Comment

polyculture learning

Recently I have published number of posts on topics such as ‘polyculture eyes’, trust, and welcoming the wild.  However that is not to say that forest gardening is all or only about allowing nature to have a free for all … Continue reading

Posted in ecosystem, forest garden development, Forest Gardening, Indigenous wisdom and practice, Polyculture learning, Principles of forest gardening, Relationship with nature, the garden of equal delights | 2 Comments

where is the wild?

The unchallenged perception we have all grown up with is to see nature on one ‘side’ and people on the other ‘side’; meaning that the ‘natural world’ is that remnant which is not under the jurisdiction or control of people.  … Continue reading

Posted in a forest garden is gardened differently, ecosystem, forest garden development, Forest Gardening, Principles of forest gardening, Relationship with nature | 1 Comment

polyculture eyes

Above all else a forest gardener needs to be in touch with their garden.  My book ‘the garden of equal delights’ is my attempt to discover the essence of the relationship between a forest gardener and their forest garden, and … Continue reading

Posted in Forest Gardening, Principles of forest gardening, Relationship with nature | Tagged | 2 Comments

trust and the forest gardener

To trust is to feel confident and able to depend on someone or something (my definition).  And control is a clear marker of the loss of trust.  Forest gardening hinges on the forest gardener learning to trust and giving up … Continue reading

Posted in a forest garden is gardened differently, Forest Gardening, Principles of forest gardening, Relationship with nature, the garden of equal delights | 4 Comments

healing for broken places and broken people

We are all, to some extent, broken by our life experiences; and at the same time through our 21st century lifestyles we contribute to the broken-ness of our world.  These are two halves of the same wound.  And because of … Continue reading

Posted in a different gardener, Forest Gardening, Principles of forest gardening, Relationship with nature, the garden of equal delights | Leave a comment

firmly rooted in mother earth

When I planted my fruit trees I did not pay heed to the conventional gardening advice.  I did not use any compost in the planting holes, I did not stake them or use tree guards.  I left these activities un-done … Continue reading

Posted in a forest garden is gardened differently, Borderland Garden, forest garden development, Forest Gardening, Fruit trees, Principles of forest gardening | 3 Comments